and wins.

After hearing too many fellow teens in her ballet class complain about their weight, the 14-year-old started her campaign in April with a petition on Change.org. It called for the magazine to print one unaltered photo spread each month. The petition — and a demonstration at the corporate offices of Hearst, which owns Seventeen — led to more than 80,000 signatures from around the world.

The barrage of correspondence from young girls led Ann Shoket, Seventeen‘s editor-in-chief, to invite Julia for a meeting and subsequently put out a new policy statement on the magazine’s photo enhancements.

The New York Times reports that while Shoket stresses the magazine “never has, never will” digitally alter the body or face shapes of its models, her editor’s letter in the upcoming August issue will reaffirm its commitment. Skolet writes that the entire Seventeen staff has signed aneight-point Body Peace Treaty, promising not to alter natural shapes and include only images of “real girls and models who are healthy.”

“While we work hard behind the scenes to make sure we’re being authentic, your notes made me realize that it was time for us to be more public about our commitment,” Shoket writes in her letter to readers, published in part in Tuesday’s Times. The magazine also promises greater transparency surrounding its photo shoots, showing what goes into the shoots on its behind-the-scenes Tumblr.

Julia, an 8th grader, all of 14 years old, also got Seventeen Magazine to put out a Body Peace Treaty:

bodypeacetreaty

how’s that for showing us all up?

read about the rest of it here, and here, and here.

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